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ASAP Farm Tour Canceled Due to Threat of Avian Flu

Tuesday, September 8th, 2015

ASHEVILLE NC – In response to the threat of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza, ASAP (Appalachian Sustainable Agriculture Project) has canceled their 2015 Farm Tour. The tour was planned for September 19-20 and was to feature more than 30 farms across Western North Carolina.

“It is with great regret that that we must cancel the Farm Tour as it offers life-changing farm experiences for locals and visitors alike and brings much-needed revenue and support to area farmers,” said ASAP’s Executive Director Charlie Jackson. “But the risk of inviting thousands of visitors to multiple farms during this time is too much of a threat to ignore. The potential spread of this disease could be devastating for commercial and backyard poultry flocks throughout the region.”

The mortality rate for infected birds is nearly 100%. Approximately 50 million birds have died in the U.S. as a result of HPAI this year. This current outbreak does not infect people, and meat and eggs continue to be safe for human consumption. The primary concern is with the spread of the disease to birds. This particular strain of influenza is unusually infectious and has the potential to impact all North Carolina poultry farming, large and small. North Carolina State Veterinarian Dr. R. Douglas Meckes  calls this outbreak the “worst animal disease event in U.S. history.”

HPAI is considered a seasonal threat, thought to be transmitted from wild waterfowl to domestic poultry. This outbreak is unusually deadly and contagious for poultry. As the fall migration of wild birds birds progresses with cooler temperatures, there is a high likelihood that it will impact poultry in our region. Once here, it can easily be carried to chicken flocks by humans on shoes, clothing, and even car tires.

“Now, more than ever, we need to support our farms,” said Jackson. “Please continue to visit farms, orchards, shop at farmers tailgate markets, and seek out restaurants and grocers that purchase from local farms. There are numerous local food and farm activities that we can all do to continue to show our support for local food and farms.”

ASAP will offer a full refund for all advanced Farm Tour passes sold, or they can be converted to donations to support local farms. Contact Scott Bunn, ASAP’s Development Director, at [email protected] or 828-236-1282 for more information. Visit ASAP’s online Local Food Guide (www.appalachiangrown.org) to find ways to buy from local farms. The North Carolina Department of Agriculture’s website (www.ncagr.gov/avianflu) provide more  information about HPAI, including the agricultural impact of the virus.

ABOUT ASAP (APPALACHIAN SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE PROJECT)

ASAP’s mission is to help local farms thrive, link farmers to markets and supporters, and build healthy communities through connections to local food. To learn more about ASAP’s work in the region, visit asapconnections.org, or call (828) 236-1282.

Peppers are Popping in September

Wednesday, September 2nd, 2015

ASHEVILLE NC – This month peppers from Appalachian Grown farms bring a little sweet and a little heat to ASAP’s Get Local campaign. Area farmers grow such a variety of peppers from sweet bells to spicy habaneros to peppers for frying like padróns and peppers for stuffing like poblanos. Chefs at Appalachian Grown partner restaurants take full advantage of this abundance this month to celebrate ASAP’s Get Local campaign.

  • The Hop Ice Cream Café will feature heat from Smoking J’s Fiery Foods in their chocolate and hot pepper ice cream, as well as using experimenting with pepper jellies in the month of September.
  • Posana Café has an exciting event planned this month that will include Appalachian Grown peppers and other fall delicacies. For the sixth year, Posana will host a fundraiser to benefit ASAP’s Growing Minds Farm to School Program. On Thursday, September 24, Executive chef/co-owner Peter Pollay and his team are creating a special Appalachian Grown dinner menu featuring area farms and the fall harvest. All of the proceeds from the special menu will support ASAP’s efforts to enable children to have positive experiences with local food.
  • The Park Ridge Café at Park Ridge Health will be using purple, red, orange, and yellow peppers from Leadford Farms in a chopped cucumber and feta-tomato Greek salad. Additionally, they’ll have a vegetarian stuffed pepper with white beans and a vegetarian chorizo with goat cheese and toasted pepita-cilantro pesto. They use local peppers in soups, sauces, and plenty of other dishes available throughout the month of September.
  • UNC Dining Services will be using local peppers from Perez Farms in Henderson and Rutherford County, including hot peppers in a shrimp diablo as well as yellow bell peppers in their salad bar this month.

ASAP’s Farm Tour is on September 19–20. Farm Tour-goers can Get Local themselves by buying peppers from many farms participating in the tour including Smoking J’s Fiery Foods. Most of ASAP’s Get Local restaurants source from one or more farms on this year’s Tour. Visit Get Local restaurants to support these farms and purchase your Farm Tour ticket at asapconnections.org to visit the farms that feed you.

Visit ASAP’s website at asapconnections.org/getlocal to find details on what’s happening this month. You can also Get Local at home: Find each month’s featured food—and other seasonal products—at your neighborhood farmers tailgate market, roadside stand, or grocery store. Browse for markets, stands, and stores via ASAP’s online Local Food Guide at appalachiangrown.org.


ABOUT ASAP (APPALACHIAN SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE PROJECT)

ASAP’s mission is to help local farms thrive, link farmers to markets and supporters, and build healthy communities through connections to local food. To learn more about ASAP’s work, visit asapconnections.org, or call (828) 236-1282.

We All Say Local Tomatoes!

Wednesday, August 12th, 2015

ASHEVILLE NC – Oh, the month we’ve all been waiting for – tomato month! Salads, sauces, soups, pies, jams, salsa, roasted, grilled and simply fresh sliced—so many great ways to serve up tomatoes. Shop for these great tasting fruits in all sorts of varieties and colors at area farmers tailgate markets and look for summer specials on menus of Appalachian Grown™ partner restaurant and dining rooms around the region.

  • UNC Asheville will be featuring Appalachian Grown tomatoes on salad bars this month, as well as in cooking class for incoming freshman orientation. Saturday, August 29th join UNC Asheville’s Registered Dietitian, Laura Sexton, for a tomato tasting at the North Asheville Tailgate Market.
  • The Marketplace is using tomatoes everywhere this summer: in an heirloom tomato salad; a mixed, confit tomato vinaigrette will accompany pan-seared trout from Sunburst Trout Farms; and included in a watermelon panzanella the will accompany a pan-roasted wild snapper. The Marketplace even makes their own homemade thyme ketchup using local tomatoes. They source tomatoes primarily from Gaining Ground Farm and Synchronicity Farms.

 

  • Rosetta’s Kitchen has partnered with Franny’s Farm in Leicester to feature their beefsteak slicing tomatoes in August in honor of tomato month.

 

  • Guadalupe Cafe is using cherry and grape tomatoes in salads, heirloom tomatoes on special sandwiches, and both heirlooms and beefsteak in all of their salsas. Guadalupe primarily sources tomatoes from Shelton Family Farm in Jackson County, as well as Twisted Ridge Farms, Berry Farm, and Dawson Green.

 

  • ASAP’s Local Summer Cookout will include local tomatoes from Ivy Creek Family Farm, as well as Hickory Nut Gap Farms pork ribs, and many more delicious veggie sides prepared by Chef Philip Bollhoefer of the OMNI Grove Park Inn. The cookout will take place Thursday, August 13 at Catawba Brewing on the South Slope, Asheville. Tickets are available at asapconnections.org.

 

Visit ASAP’s website at asapconnections.org, and find Get Local under the “find” tab to find details on what’s happening this month. You can also Get Local at home: Find each month’s featured food—and other seasonal products—at your neighborhood farmers tailgate market, roadside stand, or grocery store. Browse for markets, stands, and stores via ASAP’s online Local Food Guide at appalachiangrown.org.


ABOUT ASAP (Appalachian Sustainable Agriculture Project)

ASAP’s mission is to help local farms thrive, link farmers to markets and supporters, and build healthy communities through connections to local food. To learn more about ASAP’s work, visit asapconnections.org, or call (828) 236-1282.

 

 

July is a Very Berry Month with ASAP

Monday, July 20th, 2015

ASHEVILLE NC – Local berries are the stars of summer – from the last of the strawberries to blue-hued blueberries and rosy-red raspberries—which are popping up now at area farmers tailgate markets and on the menus of Appalachian Grown™ partner restaurants.

Many Get Local participating restaurants will be elevating berries to great heights this month. Blueberries, raspberries, blackberries, wine berries will top sweet treats and make their way into savory dishes at Get Local restaurants dining rooms and at markets around the region.

  • The Hop Ice Cream Café will be doing a special berry month fundraiser for ASAP at The Hop Ice Creamery on Friday, July 24, 6-9 pm. Special berry flavors will be featured. The Hop regularly sources berries from Rayburn Farm, Stepps Plants, and Stoney Hollow Farm. The Hop Ice Creamery is located at 167 Haywood Road in East West Asheville.
  • Vortex Doughnuts has a variety of doughnut specials this month. They are using heirloom strawberries from Rayburn Farm for a strawberry jam-filled doughnut and a strawberry shortcake doughnut. This week, Vortex sources from Appalachian Grown farms for blueberries to use in their blueberry basil doughnuts. Upcoming specials include blueberry lemon doughnuts and blueberries and cream doughnut.
  • Rosetta’s Kitchen will feature a salad special they call “Berry Superstitious” with a base of organic and local mixed greens, local blueberries, fresh d’anjou pear slices, English cucumber, shredded carrots , local pea & sunflower sprouts and a housemade herb-tofu “ricotta.”

Visit ASAP’s website at asapconnections.org, and find Get Local under the “find” tab to find details on what’s happening this month. You can also Get Local at home: Find each month’s featured food—and other seasonal products—at your neighborhood farmers tailgate market, roadside stand, or grocery store. Browse for markets, stands, and stores via ASAP’s online Local Food Guide at appalachiangrown.org.

ABOUT ASAP (Appalachian Sustainable Agriculture Project)

ASAP’s mission is to help local farms thrive, link farmers to markets and supporters, and build healthy communities through connections to local food. To learn more about ASAP’s work, visit asapconnections.org, or call (828) 236-1282.

Have a Hive of a Time This June

Wednesday, June 3rd, 2015

ASHEVILLE NC – Life is sweet in the Southern Appalachians, especially in June. The spring honey flow started in May, which means local honey harvested this year arrives at Appalachian Grown™ farmers tailgate markets, groceries, and eateries this month. What’s more, the Sourwood flow—our region is famous for its Sourwood honey; after all, the varietal is produced predominately in the Blue Ridge Mountains—usually begins around the summer solstice.

Several Asheville-area Get Local participating restaurants will whip up honey specials throughout the month:

  • King James Public House will have two specials with Wild Mountain honey. The first is a Get Local feature drink they call ‘Ted, Just Admit It…’ that has anejo tequila, Appalachian Grown honey, peach-pepper jam, fresh lemon juice, and egg whites. King James will also feature an Apple Brandy Farm skirt steak from their neighbor The Chop Shop, served with blue hominy succotash, local honey hominy puree, and a local honey glaze.
  • The Market Place uses wildflower honey from Haw Creek Honey. The honey is featured in their Saffron & Wildflower Honey Creme Brûlée with Pink Peppercorn Biscotti. Chef William Dissen says that the saffron is sourced directly from a crocus flower farm in Kashmir by his mother and father-in-law. He says that the dessert has a wonderful, floral undertone that really enhances the velvety texture of the creme brûlée.
  • A special at Curate this month is Berenjenas la Taberna, a fried eggplant drizzled in Wild Mountain Bees honey, garnished with rosemary. They will also feature Miel y Mato, a watermelon sorbet with a capricho goat cheese “snow” with honey and candied honey.
  • Over at Nightbell, they will feature honey in their grilled Maitake mushroom dish which is glazed with sesame oil and fish sauce, finished with orange zest, honey, togarashi, and a garlic cream sauce. They also have stone ground grit hush puppies served with an orange Wild Mountain Bees honey butter dipping sauce.

Visit ASAP’s website at asapconnections.org, and find Get Local under the “find” tab to find details on what’s happening this month. You can also Get Local at home: Find each month’s featured food—and other seasonal products—at your neighborhood farmers tailgate market, roadside stand, or grocery store. Browse for markets, stands, and stores via ASAP’s online Local Food Guide at appalachiangrown.org.


ABOUT ASAP (Appalachian Sustainable Agriculture Project)

ASAP’s mission is to help local farms thrive, link farmers to markets and supporters, and build healthy communities through connections to local food. To learn more about ASAP’s work, visit asapconnections.org, or call (828) 236-1282.

ASAP’s 2015 Local Food Guide is Here!

Wednesday, April 8th, 2015

ASHEVILLE NC – The growing season has arrived in WNC and the Southern Appalachians! Look for signs of spring with seasonal specialties found at tailgate farmers markets, featured at restaurants, and purchased at roadside stands. It is also the time of year to pick up the newest edition of ASAP’s Local Food Guide to help consumers find the best sources for Appalachian Grown™ food.

“The community asks for local food, and ASAP’s Local Food Guide is the best way to find it,” says Molly Nicholie, ASAP’s Local Food Campaign Director. “In the guide, you can find nearly 700 local farms, 100 farmers tailgate markets, hundreds of restaurants, grocers and other outlets for food and farm products with an astounding variety of local products.”

This year’s Local Food Guide offers new information, such as which Appalachian Grown tailgate farmers market can accept credit, debit and SNAP/EBT. The guide also includes a look at several multi-generation family farms, celebrating their stories and hearing about why generations continue farming in the Southern Appalachians. Other new features include area restaurants committed to sourcing local food, along with listings of grocers, artisan food producers, B&Bs and farm lodging, wineries, and more. 

 

The 2015 Local Food Guide can be picked up hot off the press at ASAP’s booth at the Mother Earth News Fair, April 11-12, at the WNC Ag Center. ASAP is a supporting partner of the fair and we will be joined there by many Appalachian Grown farms and partner retailers. The latest guide listings can also be found online at appalachiangrown.org. Print copies will be distributed after the fair to locations throughout the region, listed at asapconnections.org. The 2015 Local Food Guide can always be picked up at ASAP’s office: 306 West Haywood Street, Asheville, NC 28801.

ABOUT ASAP (APPALACHIAN SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE PROJECT)

ASAP’s mission is to help local farms thrive, link farmers to markets and supporters, and build healthy communities through connections to local food. To learn more about ASAP’s work in the region, visit asapconnections.org, or call (828) 236-1282.

Gettin’ Cheesy with Local Cheese

Monday, April 6th, 2015

ASHEVILLE NC – This April, enjoy the abundance of Western North Carolina cheeses at Appalachian Grown partner restaurants during ASAP’s Get Local cheese month. Local cheeses find their way into all kinds of dishes at area restaurants year-round. Chefs love the variety of locally made cheeses available in the region and prominently feature them on cheese and charcuterie plates and in both sweet and savory dishes.

Get Local participating restaurants and chefs are serving up local cheeses in a variety of ways in April:

  •  The Hop Ice Cream Café will host a cheese night at The Hop Ice Creamery on April 17, 6-9 pm. The event will feature a number of different ice cream flavors using ricotta, cheddar, mascarpone, and chèvre from Looking Glass Creamery. This event will take place at The Hop Ice Creamery, the new event space and production facility located at 167 Haywood Road in West Asheville.
  • Guadalupe Café in Sylva regularly sources cheese from Dark Cove Farm, Yellow Branch Cheese, and Split Creek Farm. They offer Dark Cove Farm’s garlic and chive goat cheese rolled with avocado almond salsa in their BLT roll. The cheese also tops off their spicy adobo pork tostadas and is also served in a breakfast burrito. They use Yellow Branch Cheese’s pepper curd in their taqueria menu and in their brunch grits as well as in queso sauces, or topped on a Carolina Bison Burger. Split Creek Farm’s feta is featured with mango, bacon, chicken, and roasted garlic in their Phoenix rolls, and crumbled over a whole, split avocado filled with pico de gallo. They also like to use Split Creek cheese in soft corn taco specials, including those featuring Brasstown Beef carne asada or Sunburst Trout.
  • The Market Place regularly uses local cheese in specials and regular menu items. They source cheese from the following local cheese makers: Ashe County Cheese, Blue Ridge Mountain Creamery, Looking Glass Creamery, Spinning Spider Creamery, and Three Graces Dairy.

Another great way to find local cheese in April is at the Carolina Mountain Cheese Fest. This celebration of Southern cheese will be at Highland Brewing on Sunday, April 26. The fest will include events and tastings from a variety of Appalachian Grown cheese makers. One event at the fest you won’t want to miss is the Grilled Cheese Challenge featuring many Get Local restaurants and Appalachian Grown partners including King James Public House, Bouchon, Rhubarb, Lexington Avenue Brewery, and more. Find out more at mountaincheesefest.com. ASAP is a sponsor of the Carolina Mountain Cheese Fest.

Visit ASAP’s website at asapconnections.org/getlocal to find details on what’s happening this month. You can also Get Local at home: Find each month’s featured food—and other seasonal products—at your neighborhood farmers tailgate market, roadside stand, or grocery store. Browse for markets, stands, and stores via ASAP’s online Local Food Guide at appalachiangrown.org.


ABOUT ASAP (APPALACHIAN SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE PROJECT)

ASAP’s mission is to help local farms thrive, link farmers to markets and supporters, and build healthy communities through connections to local food. To learn more about ASAP’s work, visit asapconnections.org, or call (828) 236-1282.

Tailgate Tents Going Up

Friday, March 27th, 2015

ASHEVILLE NC – Spring is here and the growing season is upon us! Tailgate tents are going up, and area farmers markets are opening outdoors for the season. Celebrate spring by getting a taste of what is growing in your community. At early spring markets, expect fresh greens, spring onions and asparagus; meats, cheeses, baked goods, value-added farm products like preserves, and a wide selection of plant starts. Produce offerings will differ from market to market based on the location of vendor farms—microclimates vary greatly in the region. But the season changes quickly, with new offerings sprouting up each week.

Find a list of spring tailgate opening days for the central mountains below. For a complete list of the 90+ tailgate markets in the region, including their season start dates, visit ASAP’s online Local Food Guide at appalachiangrown.org. The 2015 print guide hits stands in mid-April.

Opening Dates in the central mountains:

Asheville City Market: April 4, Saturdays 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Asheville City Market South: April 1, Wednesdays 12:00-4:00 pm

Bakersville Farmers Market: April 4, Saturdays 8:00 am-12:00 pm

Black Mountain Tailgate Market: May 2, Saturdays 9:00 am-12:00 pm

East Asheville Tailgate Market: May 1, Fridays 3:00-6:00 pm

Flat Rock Farmers Market: May 7, Thursdays 3:00-6:00 pm

French Broad Food Co-op Wednesday Tailgate Market: April 15, Wednesdays, 2:00-6:00 pm

Haywood’s Historic Farmers Market: April 25. Wednesdays and Saturdays 8:00 am-12:00 pm

Henderson County Tailgate Market: March 14, Saturdays 7:00 am-12:00 pm

Historic Marion Tailgate Market: May 5, Tuesdays 3:00-6:00 pm and Saturdays 9:00 am-12:00 pm

Jackson County Farmers Market: April 4, Saturdays 9:00 am-12:00 pm

Leicester Farmers Market: April 4, Saturdays 9:00 am-2:00 pm

Madison County Farmers & Artisans Market: April 4, Saturdays 9:00 am-1:00 pm

Mills River Farmers Market: May 2, Saturdays 8:00 am-12:00 pm

North Asheville Tailgate Market: April 11, Saturdays 8:00 am-12:00 pm

Oakley Farmers Market: May 7, Thursdays 3:30-6:30 pm

River Arts District Farmers Market: May 6, Wednesdays 2:00 pm-6:00 pm

Spruce Pine Farmers Market: May 6, Wednesdays 2:00-5:00 pm

Transylvania Farmers Market: April 18, Saturdays 8:00 am-12:00 pm

Original Waynesville Tailgate Market: May 13, Wednesdays and Saturdays 8:00 am-12:00 pm

Weaverville Tailgate Market: April 8, Wednesdays 2:30-6:30 pm

West Asheville Tailgate Market: April 7, Tuesdays 3:30-6:30 pm

Yancey County Farmers Market: April 18, Saturdays 8:30 am-12:30 pm


ABOUT ASAP (APPALACHIAN SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE PROJECT)

ASAP’s mission is to help local farms thrive, link farmers to markets and supporters, and build healthy communities through connections to local food. To learn more about ASAP’s work, visit asapconnections.org, or call (828) 236-1282.

ASAP Announces Cost Share and Promotional Support for Area Farmers

Thursday, March 19th, 2015

ASHEVILLE NC – ASAP announces the launch of a farmer cost share program and the renewal of its popular wax produce box initiative, both designed to maximize economic opportunities for local farmers and identify “certified local food” in the marketplace in Western North Carolina. Both programs are part of ASAP’s Appalachian Grown™ program, which helps farmers enhance the competitiveness of their products in local markets. Through increased visibility of the Appalachian Grown brand, consumers can clearly identify certified local food where they shop and dine.

ASAP created the Appalachian Grown certification program in 2007 so that consumers can feel confident that the farm products they seek out in the marketplace were grown or raised in the Southern Appalachians and that their local food purchase helps support the local economy.

“Appalachian Grown is a powerful tool for farmers and consumers alike,” said Molly Nicholie, ASAP’s Local Food Campaign Director. “Resources such as the cost share program and Appalachian Grown branded wax boxes help farmers reduce marketing costs and build a cohesive identity for family farms in the Southern Appalachians. Simultaneously these programs help consumers identify authentic local farm products and can support local food, strong farms, and healthy communities with their food dollars.”

Cost share funds are made possible through support from the North Carolina Tobacco Trust Fund Commission, and are available for farms in North Carolina to be used for design and production of custom labels, packaging, or promotional materials featuring the Appalachian Grown logo. More information about the cost share program is available at asapconnections.org.

The Appalachian Grown wax produce box program allows ASAP to use the bulk buying power of over 700 farms to offer packaging materials at an affordable price for growers, helping them meet market requirements and enhance the visibility and marketability of their products. This program is supported by the Golden LEAF Foundation, the North Carolina Tobacco Trust Fund Commission, and The Community Foundation of Western North Carolina.  A new shipment of boxes will arrive in early April in time for the spring growing season. This year, ASAP is offering discounted pallet prices for farms that pre-order. Wax box pre-orders are available now through asapconnections.org.

For more questions about the cost share program, order wax boxes, or Appalachian Grown, visit asapconnections.org, or contact [email protected].

ABOUT ASAP (APPALACHIAN SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE PROJECT)

ASAP’s mission is to help local farms thrive, link farmers to markets and supporters, and build healthy communities through connections to local food. To learn more about ASAP’s work in the region, visit asapconnections.org, or call (828) 236-1282.

Get Local With Greens In March

Saturday, March 7th, 2015

ASHEVILLE NC – This month ASAP is celebrating local greens for their Get Local campaign. Even though spring won’t officially arrive for a couple weeks, greens are sprouting up at local restaurants! Thanks to season extension, farmers are able to supply greens like lettuce and kale throughout the winter. From classic Southern collards with ham to fresh, raw kale salads, chefs get creative with these nutritious leafy veggies. Different varieties of greens are popping up in restaurant dishes and on farmers market tables.

To celebrate greens, the following Appalachian Grown™ partner restaurants are greening their menus:

  • On March 12, 6-8 pm, Early Girl Eatery is hosting A Celebration of CSA, a local food social and fundraiser to showcase Appalachian Grown certified farms and support ASAP. Immediately following ASAP’s CSA Fair, the celebration will feature ingredients sourced directly from farms participating at the fair. Expect tasty small bites including kale salad, mini-quiches, Korean chicken, local Monte Cristo sandwiches, and more. Tickets are $20 at apasconnections.org or Early Girl Eatery.
  • The Omni at Grove Park Inn is featuring spinach from Ivy Creek Family Farm, using it in a wide variety of ways including market vegetable, goat cheese and spinach raviolis, and incorporated into regular menu items as well.
  • At Guadalupe Café in Sylva, they are using lettuce and greens from Sunny Creek Farm and Dawson Farm throughout their menu, including brunch and dinner specials, stir fries, filling for tacos, and more.
  • The Market Place sources from a number of Appalachian Grown farms for their greens and lettuces including New River Organic Growers and The Culinary Gardener.

Visit ASAP’s website at asapconnections.org/getlocal to find details on what’s happening this month. You can also Get Local at home: Find each month’s featured food—and other seasonal products—at your neighborhood farmers tailgate market, roadside stand, or grocery store. Browse for markets, stands, and stores via ASAP’s online Local Food Guide at appalachiangrown.org.

ABOUT ASAP (APPALACHIAN SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE PROJECT)

ASAP’s mission is to help local farms thrive, link farmers to markets and supporters, and build healthy communities through connections to local food. To learn more about ASAP’s work, visit asapconnections.org, or call (828) 236-1282.