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Asheville’s Water Supply is Stable, Conservation Appreciated

Friday, August 7th, 2015

ASHEVILLE NC – The City of Asheville Water Resources Department would like to thank customers for their continued efforts to conserve water and use this valuable resource wisely. Although neighboring counties are experiencing conditions which require additional water restrictions, the City of Asheville water supply volumes remain at a level that allow customers to continue normal water use.

The City uses a detailed water model and operating procedure to forecast water availability. Currently, the forecast indicates that there is adequate water supply and no need for water restrictions for City of Asheville customers.  Water availability will continue to be monitored very closely and if conditions change the public will received additional information on the topic.

Asheville Water Outages Scheduled

Monday, July 6th, 2015

ASHEVILLE NC – The City of Asheville Water Resources Department has several water interruptions scheduled this week:

July 6-7, 9 p.m. to 6 p.m.: North District, the affected areas are Merrimon Avenue from Larchmont Drive, to Lakeshore Drive and from Lakeshore Drive to Red Oak Road, Also to included Sandon Drive, Sandon Circle, Colonial Place, Horizon Hill , Cambridge Road, Mount Verron Circle.

July 7, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.: South District, the affected areas are Rhododendron Drive from Appian Way, to Ivy Court.

July 7-8, 11 p.m. to 7 a.m.: East District, the affected areas are Brook Street from Lodge Street to Sweeten Creek Road.

July 9, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.: East District the affected areas are, Reed Road from Riceville Road, to the dead end of the road on Reed Road, also included East Mountain Way, Clarke Road.

Notifications
Residents are normally informed about water outages. Residents are also encouraged to register with the City’s Citizen Alert Registration service at member.everbridge.net.

For more information about outages and the Water Services Department, visit ashevillenc.gov/wateroutages.

City of Asheville Annual Water Quality Report

Monday, April 14th, 2014

ASHEVILLE NC – The City of Asheville’s Water Resources Department continues to deliver water that meets or exceeds federal water quality regulations, and an annual report currently being delivered to water customers displays the results of water quality testing.

Each year, the City of Asheville distributes its annual water quality report in water customers’ bills and posts it to the City of Asheville website. The report, mandated by the Environmental Protection Agency, presents the types and concentrations of substances found in samples taken from both the water plant and locations throughout the service area. That level of transparency is especially valuable considering the importance of water quality to the community. The 2013 report going out during March and April shows that Asheville’s water supply is cleaner in all categories than required by EPA standards.

“We are always proud to share the water quality report with the community. We are fortunate to have Asheville’s pristine water resources as well as the employees who work hard to ensure that our customers receive excellent water quality every day,” said Stephen Shoaf, Director of the Water Resources Department.

The City of Asheville Water Resources Department operates three water treatment plants, 37 pump stations, and 32 reservoirs, and protects and manages a 22,000 acre watershed. The North Fork water treatment facility processes an average of 15 million gallons of water a day, while the Mills River and William DeBruhl plants produce about 3 million gallons a day. System wide, the City of Asheville Water Resources facilities process 20.5 gallons of water per day and service more than 123,000 customers.

The City of Asheville’s water quality is closely monitored on a daily basis by laboratory technicians who collect and analyze water both at the plant facilities and throughout the distribution system. Lab technicians collect roughly 120 samples per month from sample sites throughout Asheville and areas served by City of Asheville water.   Asheville has a large distribution system, therefore Water Resources staff regularly monitor, sample and flush portions of the system to ensure high quality drinking water.

Each plant routinely analyzes the raw and finished water for temperature, turbidity, pH, chlorine, total and fecal coliform bacteria.  Routine distribution sampling and analysis consists of: pH, alkalinity, temperature, chlorine, total and fecal coliforms.    The EPA requires the analysis of various other constituents and all of those results were below limits set by the EPA.

This informative report provides details about the quality of the water provided to the city’s customers as well as the water sources and how it is treated.  Customers can find the report in their next water bills or see it online at http://www.ashevillenc.gov/Departments/Water.aspx, and may expect an update of this report each year.

For further information or additional copies of the City of Asheville’s 2013 Annual Water Quality Report, call the City of Asheville Customer Services Division at (828) 251-1122.

Asheville 2012 Annual Water Quality Report

Wednesday, April 3rd, 2013

ASHEVILLE NC – The City of Asheville has released its 15th annual Water Quality Report, a federally-mandated “report card” designed to educate customers on what is in their drinking water.  The City of Asheville is pleased to report that the city’s drinking water continues to surpass all US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Safe Drinking Water Standards.

Click here for the 2012 Water Quality Report.

Stephen Shoaf, Director of the Water Resources Department says, “I am proud of this Water Quality Report and the employees who work hard to ensure that our customers receive excellent water quality every day.  Congress and the EPA have mandated this report and, to a large extent, its format and content.  The EPA wants to be sure every community knows what is in its drinking water.  The City of Asheville Water Resources Department agrees.  The Water Quality Report will increase our customers’ understanding of and confidence in the quality of their water supply and ongoing efforts to maintain the highest standards possible.”

This informative report provides details about water quality provided to the city’s customers as well as where the water comes from and how it is treated.  Customers will receive the report in their next water bills and can expect an update of this report each year.

For further information or additional copies of the City of Asheville’s 2012 Annual Water Quality Report, call the City of Asheville Customer Services Division at (828) 251-1122.

Discolored Water Anticipated in Coming Days and Weeks

Monday, February 4th, 2013

ASHEVILLE NC – The City of Asheville Water Resources Department is anticipating discolored water in the coming days and weeks ahead.  Contractors are using camera systems inside of our main water lines to evaluate their condition, which is stirring up sediment in the pipes.  This critical pipe infrastructure is between 50 and 90 years old, and is responsible for delivering an average of 16.5 million gallons of water to the Asheville and Buncombe County areas on a daily basis.  We have crews available around the clock that will flush hydrants downstream from the work to lessen the discoloration.  Contractors conducting the evaluation plan to work on the project 5 days a week, Monday through Friday.  The portion of the project causing the discolored water is scheduled to last through mid to late March 2013.

Customers who experience discolored water should call the Customer Services division at (828) 251-1122 to report it.  A call allows the Water Resources Department to flush where needed in order to help clear the discolored water from the reported location.

While the water is safe for cleaning, hand washing and bathing, we recommend the discolored water not be used for cooking or drinking as a precaution. We are monitoring bacteria levels, and the system is closed so there is no belief that pathogens entered the system. A boil advisory has not been issued.

Customers are advised not to wash clothing with the discolored water because it may cause stains.

Customers experiencing discolored water may consider running faucets for a short period of time to rid pipes of discolored water.  Customers are reminded hot water heaters store water and if discolored water has entered the tank, it may take the hot water longer to return to normal.

Customers are also encouraged to check residential filters and faucet screens for sediments.  In many cases this is simple and involves unscrewing the screen at the head of a faucet.

Once water color returns to normal it is safe for all uses.

The City of Asheville thanks water customers for their patience during this process to ensure longevity and sustainability to the City of Asheville water system.